Linode NextGen: RAM Upgrade

This is the third and final post in a series about Linode: NextGen. The first post in the series focused on network upgrades and the second post focused on host hardware. This post announces yet another upgrade, and discusses the upgrade procedure and availability.

We’re doubling the RAM on all of our plans. This upgrade is available to existing and new customers. New Linodes will automatically be created with the new resources. Existing Linodes will need to go through the Upgrade Queue to receive the upgrades.

The new Linode plans lineup is now the following:

Plan RAM Disk XFER CPU Price
Linode 1G 1 GB 24 GB 2 TB 8 cores (1x priority) $20 / mo
Linode 2G 2 GB 48 GB 4 TB 8 cores (2x priority) $40 / mo
Linode 4G 4 GB 96 GB 8 TB 8 cores (4x priority) $80 / mo
Linode 8G 8 GB 192 GB 16 TB 8 cores (8x priority) $160 / mo
Linode 16G 16 GB 384 GB 20 TB 8 cores (16x priority) $320 / mo
Linode 24G 24 GB 576 GB 20 TB 8 cores (24x priority) $480 / mo
Linode 32G 32 GB 768 GB 20 TB 8 cores (32x priority) $640 / mo
Linode 40G 40 GB 960 GB 20 TB 8 cores (40x priority) $800 / mo
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Upgrade Queue

Here’s how to get the upgrade for your existing Linode: Log into the Linode Manager and view your Linode’s Dashboard, where you’ll have a new “Upgrade Available” box on the right-hand side. This links to a page describing the upgrade process, which is very simple. Simply click the button and your Linode will enter the Upgrade Queue. While in the queue, your Linode can remain booted.

Once it’s your Linode’s turn in the queue, your Linode will be shut down, upgraded, and migrated to another host. The migration will take about 1 minute per GB of disk images. After the migration has completed, your Linode will be returned to its last state (booted or shutdown) – but with the new RAM!

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Full disclosure: the new plans are $0.05 more expensive per month. We did this to get rid of the legacy $19.95, $39.95, $59.95, etc pricing model in favor of a simpler $20, $40, $60 model. The upgrade is not mandatory, so if you’re not down with the 5 cent increase you can keep your existing resources and pricing.

Upgrade Availability

We’ll be enabling the upgrade by data center very soon, with the exception of Fremont which may take another week or two – we’ll be explaining more on Fremont in another post.

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Fremont, CA: TBD
Dallas, TX: Upgrades are available
Atlanta, GA: Upgrades are available
Newark, NJ: Upgrades are available
London, UK: Upgrades are available
Tokyo, JP: Upgrades are available

Check back regularly for updates for your data center.

Linode NextGen Recap

This has been a great couple of weeks for Linode and our customers. We’ve spent millions improving our network, a fleet refresh with new hardware and 8 core Linodes, and now this: doubling your RAM without doubling the price. Enjoy!

-Chris

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