How to Troubleshoot TCP_MISS_Aborted/000 in Squid Proxy Server

How to Troubleshoot TCP_MISS_Aborted_000 in Squid Proxy Server

In the world of proxy servers, a well-known and widely used software is Squid. It serves as a caching and forwarding HTTP web proxy, providing a variety of features that enhance the performance and security of large network systems. However, like any software, it’s not immune to issues.

One such issue that administrators often encounter is the TCP_MISS_Aborted/000 error. This error can be puzzling, especially if you’re not familiar with Squid’s logging terminologies.

In this tutorial, we will discuss TCP_MISS_Aborted/000 in-depth, what it means, why it occurs, and most importantly, how to troubleshoot it.

By the end of this guide, you will be equipped with the knowledge to resolve this issue and ensure the smooth operation of your Squid proxy server.

Before we proceed, it’s important to understand what TCP_MISS means in Squid. TCP_MISS is a log code that indicates that a requested object was not in the cache, and the server had to fetch a fresh copy from the source. The “/000” following TCP_MISS indicates the HTTP status code of the response. In this case, “000” means that the server didn’t receive any response from the source.

Now, let’s dive into the troubleshooting process.

Step 1: Verify Network Connectivity

The first step in troubleshooting the TCP_MISS_Aborted/000 error is to verify the network connectivity between your Squid proxy server and the source server. This is crucial because if your Squid server cannot reach the source server, it will not be able to fetch the requested resources, leading to the TCP_MISS_Aborted/000 error.

You can verify network connectivity by using the ping or traceroute commands. Here’s how you can do it:

Using the Ping Command

The ping command is a simple tool that sends ICMP Echo Request packets to the target host and listens for ICMP Echo Reply packets. The time taken for the packets to return is reported, giving you an idea of the network latency between your Squid server and the source server.

Here’s an example of how to use the ping command:

sudo ping -c 4 source_server.com

In this command, replace source_server.com with the domain name or IP address of the source server. The -c 4 option tells ping to send 4 packets.

If the network connection is good, you should see output similar to this:

PING source_server.com (192.0.2.1) 56(84) bytes of data.
64 bytes from source_server.com (192.0.2.1): icmp_seq=1 ttl=64 time=0.027 ms
64 bytes from source_server.com (192.0.2.1): icmp_seq=2 ttl=64 time=0.033 ms
64 bytes from source_server.com (192.0.2.1): icmp_seq=3 ttl=64 time=0.030 ms
64 bytes from source_server.com (192.0.2.1): icmp_seq=4 ttl=64 time=0.031 ms

If you see Request timed out or Destination Host Unreachable messages, it means there are network connectivity issues that you need to resolve.

Using the Traceroute Command

The traceroute command is another useful tool for diagnosing network connectivity issues. It shows the path that packets take from your Squid server to the source server, and it can help you identify where the connection is failing.

Here’s an example of how to use the traceroute command:

sudo traceroute source_server.com

Replace source_server.com with the domain name or IP address of the source server.

See also  How to Block Access to ALL Websites Except ONE using Squid Proxy Server

The output of the traceroute command shows the network path from your server to the source server. If there are any network issues, you will see * * * at the point where the connection fails.

If there are any network issues, you will need to resolve them before proceeding. This might involve checking your network configuration, firewall settings, or contacting your network administrator or ISP. Once you have confirmed that the network connectivity is good, you can proceed to the next step of troubleshooting the TCP_MISS_Aborted/000 error.

Step 2: Check the Squid Access Logs

192.168.0.1 TCP_MISS/200 776 GET http://xml.alexa.com/data? proxyuser1 HIER_DIRECT/23.21.109.107 text/xml
192.168.0.1 TCP_MISS/200 2285 POST http://sd.symcd.com/ proxyuser1 HIER_DIRECT/23.51.43.27 application/ocsp-response
192.168.0.1 TCP_MISS/200 915 POST http://ocsp.digicert.com/ proxyuser1 HIER_DIRECT/117.18.237.29 application/ocsp-response
192.168.0.1 TCP_MISS/200 2285 POST http://sd.symcd.com/ proxyuser1 HIER_DIRECT/23.51.43.27 application/ocsp-response
192.168.0.1 TCP_MISS_ABORTED/000 0 POST http://ocsp.thawte.com/ proxyuser1 HIER_NONE/- -
192.168.0.1 TCP_MISS_ABORTED/000 0 POST http://ocsp.thawte.com/ proxyuser1 HIER_DIRECT/199.7.71.72 -
192.168.0.1 TCP_MISS/200 794 GET 
192.168.0.1 TCP_MISS/200 446 GET http://toolbarqueries.google.com/tbr? proxyuser1 HIER_DIRECT/58.27.61.123 text/html
192.168.0.1 TCP_MISS/200 4214 GET http://xml.alexa.com/data? proxyuser1 HIER_DIRECT/23.21.109.107 text/xml

The Squid access logs are a valuable resource when troubleshooting any Squid-related issue. They provide detailed information about the requests processed by the Squid proxy server. Look for any patterns or anomalies around the time the TCP_MISS_Aborted/000 errors occurred.

Step 3: Review the Squid Configuration

The Squid configuration file, typically located at /etc/squid/squid.conf, contains the settings that control the behavior of the Squid proxy server. Review the configuration file to ensure that it’s correctly set up. Pay special attention to the ACLs (Access Control Lists) and http_access directives, as incorrect settings can lead to errors.

# Example rule allowing access from your local networks.
# Adapt to list your (internal) IP networks from where browsing
# should be allowed
acl localnet src 10.0.0.0/8	# RFC1918 possible internal network
acl localnet src 172.16.0.0/12	# RFC1918 possible internal network
acl localnet src 192.168.0.0/16	# RFC1918 possible internal network
acl localnet src fc00::/7       # RFC 4193 local private network range
acl localnet src fe80::/10      # RFC 4291 link-local (directly plugged) machines
acl webhostinggeeks.com src 192.168.1.0/24    # Your internal network

acl SSL_ports port 443
acl Safe_ports port 80		# http
acl Safe_ports port 21		# ftp
acl Safe_ports port 443		# https
acl Safe_ports port 70		# gopher
acl Safe_ports port 210		# wais
acl Safe_ports port 1025-65535	# unregistered ports
acl Safe_ports port 280		# http-mgmt
acl Safe_ports port 488		# gss-http
acl Safe_ports port 591		# filemaker
acl Safe_ports port 777		# multiling http
acl CONNECT method CONNECT

#Add this at the bottom of the ACL Section
#
acl surfing_hours time M T W H F 08:00-17:00
acl Bad_Websites  dstdomain "/etc/squid/web/Bad_Websites.squid"

#
# Recommended minimum Access Permission configuration:
#
# Only allow cachemgr access from localhost
http_access allow manager localhost
http_access deny manager

# Only allow cachemgr access from webhostinggeeks.com
http_access allow webhostinggeeks.com surfing_hours !Bad_Websites
http_access deny Bad_Websites
http_access deny webhostinggeeks.com



# Deny requests to certain unsafe ports
http_access deny !Safe_ports

# Deny CONNECT to other than secure SSL ports
http_access deny CONNECT !SSL_ports

# We strongly recommend the following be uncommented to protect innocent
# web applications running on the proxy server who think the only
# one who can access services on "localhost" is a local user
#http_access deny to_localhost

#
# INSERT YOUR OWN RULE(S) HERE TO ALLOW ACCESS FROM YOUR CLIENTS
#

# Example rule allowing access from your local networks.
# Adapt localnet in the ACL section to list your (internal) IP networks
# from where browsing should be allowed
#http_access allow localnet
http_access allow localhost

# And finally deny all other access to this proxy
http_access deny all

# Squid normally listens to port 3128
http_port 3128

# We recommend you to use at least the following line.
hierarchy_stoplist cgi-bin ?

# Uncomment and adjust the following to add a disk cache directory.
#cache_dir ufs /var/spool/squid 100 16 256

# Leave coredumps in the first cache dir
coredump_dir /var/spool/squid

# Add any of your own refresh_pattern entries above these.
refresh_pattern ^ftp:		1440	20%	10080
refresh_pattern ^gopher:	1440	0%	1440
refresh_pattern -i (/cgi-bin/|\?) 0	0%	0
refresh_pattern .		0	20%	4320

Step 4: Test with Different Clients or Destinations

Another effective troubleshooting step is to try and reproduce the error using different client machines or by requesting different destination URLs. This can help determine if the issue is specific to a certain client or destination.

See also  How to Fix Writable Issue or Error During Joomla CMS Pre-Installation Check on Linux

Testing with Different Clients

If you have access to different client machines, you can try to reproduce the error on these machines. For example, if you have a client machine running Linux, you can use the curl command to send a request through the Squid proxy server:

curl -x http://your_squid_server:3128 http://destination_url

In this command, replace your_squid_server with the IP address or hostname of your Squid server, 3128 with the port number your Squid server is listening on, and http://destination_url with the URL you’re trying to access.

If the request is successful on some client machines but not others, the issue might be with the specific client machine that’s experiencing the error.

Testing with Different Destinations

You can also try to reproduce the error by requesting different destination URLs. For example, you can use the curl command to send requests to different URLs through the Squid proxy server:

curl -x http://your_squid_server:3128 http://different_destination_url

Replace http://different_destination_url with a different URL you’re trying to access.

If the request is successful for some URLs but not others, the issue might be with the specific destination that’s causing the error.

By testing with different clients and destinations, you can narrow down the scope of the problem and get closer to identifying the root cause. Once you’ve gathered this information, you can proceed to the next step of troubleshooting the TCP_MISS_Aborted/000 error.

Step 5: Update or Reinstall Squid

If the above steps don’t resolve the issue, it might be due to a bug in the version of Squid you’re using. In such cases, updating Squid to the latest version or reinstalling it might help. Here’s how you can do it:

Updating Squid

On a CentOS or RHEL system, you can update Squid using the yum package manager:

sudo yum update squid

On a Debian or Ubuntu system, you can use the apt package manager:

sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get upgrade squid

These commands will check for updates and install them if available. After updating, you should restart Squid to ensure the new version is in use:

sudo systemctl restart squid

Reinstalling Squid

If updating Squid doesn’t resolve the issue, or if you’re already using the latest version, you can try reinstalling Squid. Here’s how:

On a CentOS or RHEL system:

sudo yum remove squid
sudo yum install squid

On a Debian or Ubuntu system:

sudo apt-get remove squid
sudo apt-get install squid

These commands will uninstall Squid and then reinstall it. After reinstalling, you should restart Squid:

sudo systemctl restart squid

Remember to back up any important configuration files before uninstalling Squid, as the uninstallation process might remove them.

See also  How to Restrict Access to Specific Websites using Squid Proxy Server on CentOS 6.2

After updating or reinstalling Squid, check if the TCP_MISS_Aborted/000 error is resolved. If not, you might need to delve deeper into the Squid configuration or network settings, or seek help from the Squid community or your network administrator.

Commands Mentioned:

  • ping – This command is used to test the network connectivity between your server and the source server.
  • traceroute – This command is used to trace the route that packets take from your server to the source server.
  • sudo nano /etc/squid/squid.conf – This command opens the Squid configuration file in the nano text editor with superuser permissions.
  • sudo systemctl restart squid – This command restarts the Squid service, applying any changes made to the configuration file.

Conclusion

Troubleshooting the TCP_MISS_Aborted/000 error in Squid can be a complex task, requiring a good understanding of Squid and its operation. However, with a systematic approach and a bit of patience, it’s certainly manageable. In this tutorial, we’ve walked through the steps to identify and resolve this issue.

Remember, the key to effective troubleshooting is to understand the problem, gather as much information as possible, and then apply logical reasoning to identify the root cause and solution.

If you have any questions or comments about this tutorial, feel free to leave a comment below. We’d love to hear from you!

FAQ

  1. What does TCP_MISS_Aborted/000 mean in Squid?

    In Squid, TCP_MISS_Aborted/000 indicates that a requested object was not in the cache (TCP_MISS), and the server had to fetch a fresh copy from the source. However, the server didn’t receive any response from the source (“/000”).

  2. How can I view the Squid access logs?

    The Squid access logs are typically located at /var/log/squid/access.log. You can view them using any text editor or log viewing tool. For real-time viewing, you can use the tail -f command.

  3. What is the location of the Squid configuration file?

    The Squid configuration file is typically located at /etc/squid/squid.conf. This file contains the settings that control the behavior of the Squid proxy server.

  4. How can I update Squid to the latest version?

    You can update Squid to the latest version using your system’s package manager. For example, on a CentOS system, you can use the yum update squid command. On an Ubuntu system, you can use the apt-get update && apt-get upgrade squid command.

  5. What is the role of ACLs in Squid?

    ACLs (Access Control Lists) in Squid are used to define and control who has access to the proxy server. They can be used to restrict access based on various criteria such as IP address, time of day, and requested URL. ACLs are defined in the Squid configuration file and are used in conjunction with http_access directives to control access to the proxy server.

Comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *