How to Check CPU on Ubuntu

How to Check CPU on Ubuntu

Ubuntu, a popular Linux distribution, is widely used in various environments, from personal computers to VPS and dedicated servers.

One of the key aspects of maintaining a healthy system is monitoring its performance. The Central Processing Unit (in short – CPU), being the heart of a web server, plays a pivotal role in system performance. Thus, understanding how to check the CPU’s status and information is crucial for any Ubuntu user.

In this guide, we will go through the various options to check CPU information on Ubuntu using the command line.

Let’s get started!

Step 1: Open the Terminal

The first step is to open the terminal on your Ubuntu machine. You can do this by clicking on the terminal icon or by using the keyboard shortcut “Ctrl + Alt + T”.

Step 2: Check CPU Information Using the lscpu Command

The “lscpu” command displays the CPU information on your Ubuntu machine. To use this command, open a terminal and type the following command:

lscpu

The output will display detailed information about the CPU, including the number of cores, clock speed, cache size, and other features.

Architecture:        x86_64
CPU op-mode(s):      32-bit, 64-bit
Byte Order:          Little Endian
CPU(s):              8
On-line CPU(s) list: 0-7
Thread(s) per core:  1
Core(s) per socket:  1
Socket(s):           8
NUMA node(s):        1
Vendor ID:           GenuineIntel
CPU family:          6
Model:               106
Model name:          Intel(R) Xeon(R) Gold 6336Y CPU @ 2.40GHz
Stepping:            6
CPU MHz:             2399.998
BogoMIPS:            4799.99
Virtualization:      VT-x
Hypervisor vendor:   KVM
Virtualization type: full
L1d cache:           32K
L1i cache:           32K
L2 cache:            4096K
L3 cache:            16384K
NUMA node0 CPU(s):   0-7

Step 3: Check CPU Usage Using the top Command

The “top” command displays the real-time CPU usage on your Ubuntu machine. To use this command, open a terminal and type the following command:

top

The output will display a live view of the system processes, including CPU usage, memory usage, and other details. To exit the “top” command, press “q” on your keyboard.

top - 14:29:29 up 20 days, 22:30,  2 users,  load average: 0.02, 0.01, 0.00
Tasks: 179 total,   1 running, 114 sleeping,   0 stopped,   0 zombie
%Cpu(s):  0.0 us,  0.0 sy,  0.0 ni, 99.9 id,  0.0 wa,  0.0 hi,  0.0 si,  0.0 st
KiB Mem : 16424164 total, 11682752 free,  1473220 used,  3268192 buff/cache
KiB Swap:        0 total,        0 free,        0 used. 14545440 avail Mem

  PID USER      PR  NI    VIRT    RES    SHR S  %CPU %MEM     TIME+ COMMAND
19454 root      20   0   42812   3964   3296 R   0.3  0.0   0:00.02 top
    1 root      20   0  225268   8920   6560 S   0.0  0.1   0:46.72 systemd
    2 root      20   0       0      0      0 S   0.0  0.0   0:00.60 kthreadd
    4 root       0 -20       0      0      0 I   0.0  0.0   0:00.00 kworker/0:0H
    6 root       0 -20       0      0      0 I   0.0  0.0   0:00.00 mm_percpu_wq
    7 root      20   0       0      0      0 S   0.0  0.0   0:01.83 ksoftirqd/0
    8 root      20   0       0      0      0 I   0.0  0.0   3:10.29 rcu_sched
    9 root      20   0       0      0      0 I   0.0  0.0   0:00.00 rcu_bh
   10 root      rt   0       0      0      0 S   0.0  0.0   0:00.73 migration/0
   11 root      rt   0       0      0      0 S   0.0  0.0   0:04.08 watchdog/0
   12 root      20   0       0      0      0 S   0.0  0.0   0:00.00 cpuhp/0
   13 root      20   0       0      0      0 S   0.0  0.0   0:00.00 cpuhp/1
   14 root      rt   0       0      0      0 S   0.0  0.0   0:03.22 watchdog/1
   15 root      rt   0       0      0      0 S   0.0  0.0   0:00.76 migration/1
   16 root      20   0       0      0      0 S   0.0  0.0   0:00.92 ksoftirqd/1
   18 root       0 -20       0      0      0 I   0.0  0.0   0:00.00 kworker/1:0H
   19 root      20   0       0      0      0 S   0.0  0.0   0:00.00 cpuhp/2
   20 root      rt   0       0      0      0 S   0.0  0.0   0:03.19 watchdog/2
   21 root      rt   0       0      0      0 S   0.0  0.0   0:00.77 migration/2
   22 root      20   0       0      0      0 S   0.0  0.0   0:00.91 ksoftirqd/2
   24 root       0 -20       0      0      0 I   0.0  0.0   0:00.00 kworker/2:0H
   25 root      20   0       0      0      0 S   0.0  0.0   0:00.00 cpuhp/3
   26 root      rt   0       0      0      0 S   0.0  0.0   0:03.12 watchdog/3
   27 root      rt   0       0      0      0 S   0.0  0.0   0:00.78 migration/3
   28 root      20   0       0      0      0 S   0.0  0.0   0:00.96 ksoftirqd/3
   30 root       0 -20       0      0      0 I   0.0  0.0   0:00.00 kworker/3:0H
   31 root      20   0       0      0      0 S   0.0  0.0   0:00.00 cpuhp/4
   32 root      rt   0       0      0      0 S   0.0  0.0   0:03.05 watchdog/4
   33 root      rt   0       0      0      0 S   0.0  0.0   0:00.81 migration/4
   34 root      20   0       0      0      0 S   0.0  0.0   0:00.90 ksoftirqd/4                                              

Step 4: Check CPU Temperature Using the lm-sensors Package (Optional)

The “lm-sensors” package is a command-line tool that can be used to monitor the temperature sensors on your Ubuntu machine, including the CPU temperature. To install “lm-sensors”, open a terminal and type the following command:

sudo apt-get install lm-sensors

Once installed, you can use the “sensors” command to display the CPU temperature. To use this command, open a terminal and type the following command:

sensors

The output will display the temperature sensors on your Ubuntu machine, including the CPU temperature.

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Commands Mentioned:

  • lscpu – a command that displays the CPU information on your Ubuntu machine.
  • top – a command that displays the real-time CPU usage on your Ubuntu machine.
  • sudo – a command that allows users to run programs with the security privileges of another user, typically the superuser.
  • apt-get – a command-line tool used to manage packages on Ubuntu.
  • lm-sensors – a package that can be used to monitor the temperature sensors on your Ubuntu machine.
  • sensors – a command that displays the temperature sensors on your Ubuntu machine.
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Conclusion:

In this guide, we have outlined the steps to check CPU information on Ubuntu using the command line. By using the “lscpu” and “top” commands, you can easily obtain the necessary information about the CPU on your Ubuntu machine.

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If you have any questions or suggestions, feel free to comment below.

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