How to Install and Securing MySQL on CentOS 6.4 VPS

MySQLMySQL Database server is one of the most popular used database in the internet especially for content management and blogging site. It’s can stores and retrieves data for the blog, websites and applications. This post will describes how you can install and securing MySQL on CentOS 6.4 virtual private server (VPS) or dedicated MySQL database server. For more information on MySQL, you can visit their website at www.mysql.com.

1. Install MySQL Database Server using yum command :

[root@centos64 ~]# yum install mysql mysql-server -y

Example :

[root@centos64 ~]# yum install mysql mysql-server -y
Loaded plugins: fastestmirror
Loading mirror speeds from cached hostfile
 * base: mirror.upsi.edu.my
 * epel: kartolo.sby.datautama.net.id
 * extras: mirror.upsi.edu.my
 * updates: mirror.upsi.edu.my
Setting up Install Process
Resolving Dependencies
--> Running transaction check
---> Package mysql.x86_64 0:5.1.69-1.el6_4 will be installed
--> Processing Dependency: mysql-libs = 5.1.69-1.el6_4 for package: mysql-5.1.69-1.el6_4.x86_64
---> Package mysql-server.x86_64 0:5.1.69-1.el6_4 will be installed
--> Processing Dependency: perl-DBI for package: mysql-server-5.1.69-1.el6_4.x86_64
--> Processing Dependency: perl-DBD-MySQL for package: mysql-server-5.1.69-1.el6_4.x86_64
--> Processing Dependency: perl(DBI) for package: mysql-server-5.1.69-1.el6_4.x86_64
--> Running transaction check
---> Package mysql-libs.x86_64 0:5.1.67-1.el6_3 will be updated
---> Package mysql-libs.x86_64 0:5.1.69-1.el6_4 will be an update
---> Package perl-DBD-MySQL.x86_64 0:4.013-3.el6 will be installed
---> Package perl-DBI.x86_64 0:1.609-4.el6 will be installed
--> Finished Dependency Resolution

Dependencies Resolved

====================================================================================================
 Package                    Arch               Version                    Repository           Size
====================================================================================================
Installing:
 mysql                      x86_64             5.1.69-1.el6_4             updates             907 k
 mysql-server               x86_64             5.1.69-1.el6_4             updates             8.7 M
Installing for dependencies:
 perl-DBD-MySQL             x86_64             4.013-3.el6                base                134 k
 perl-DBI                   x86_64             1.609-4.el6                base                705 k
Updating for dependencies:
 mysql-libs                 x86_64             5.1.69-1.el6_4             updates             1.2 M

Transaction Summary
====================================================================================================
Install       4 Package(s)
Upgrade       1 Package(s)

Total download size: 12 M
Downloading Packages:
(1/5): mysql-5.1.69-1.el6_4.x86_64.rpm                                       | 907 kB     00:07
(2/5): mysql-libs-5.1.69-1.el6_4.x86_64.rpm                                  | 1.2 MB     00:12
(3/5): mysql-server-5.1.69-1.el6_4.x86_64.rpm                                | 8.7 MB     01:30
(4/5): perl-DBD-MySQL-4.013-3.el6.x86_64.rpm                                 | 134 kB     00:00
(5/5): perl-DBI-1.609-4.el6.x86_64.rpm                                       | 705 kB     00:06
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Total                                                               101 kB/s |  12 MB     01:57
Running rpm_check_debug
Running Transaction Test
Transaction Test Succeeded
Running Transaction
  Updating   : mysql-libs-5.1.69-1.el6_4.x86_64                                                 1/6
  Installing : perl-DBI-1.609-4.el6.x86_64                                                      2/6
  Installing : perl-DBD-MySQL-4.013-3.el6.x86_64                                                3/6
  Installing : mysql-5.1.69-1.el6_4.x86_64                                                      4/6
  Installing : mysql-server-5.1.69-1.el6_4.x86_64                                               5/6
  Cleanup    : mysql-libs-5.1.67-1.el6_3.x86_64                                                 6/6
  Verifying  : mysql-libs-5.1.69-1.el6_4.x86_64                                                 1/6
  Verifying  : perl-DBD-MySQL-4.013-3.el6.x86_64                                                2/6
  Verifying  : perl-DBI-1.609-4.el6.x86_64                                                      3/6
  Verifying  : mysql-server-5.1.69-1.el6_4.x86_64                                               4/6
  Verifying  : mysql-5.1.69-1.el6_4.x86_64                                                      5/6
  Verifying  : mysql-libs-5.1.67-1.el6_3.x86_64                                                 6/6

Installed:
  mysql.x86_64 0:5.1.69-1.el6_4                 mysql-server.x86_64 0:5.1.69-1.el6_4

Dependency Installed:
  perl-DBD-MySQL.x86_64 0:4.013-3.el6                 perl-DBI.x86_64 0:1.609-4.el6

Dependency Updated:
  mysql-libs.x86_64 0:5.1.69-1.el6_4

Complete!

2. Make mysqld daemon start at boot and start MySQL Database Server :

[root@centos64 ~]# chkconfig mysqld on
[root@centos64 ~]# service mysqld start
Initializing MySQL database:  Installing MySQL system tables...
OK
Filling help tables...
OK

To start mysqld at boot time you have to copy
support-files/mysql.server to the right place for your system

PLEASE REMEMBER TO SET A PASSWORD FOR THE MySQL root USER !
To do so, start the server, then issue the following commands:

/usr/bin/mysqladmin -u root password 'new-password'
/usr/bin/mysqladmin -u root -h centos64.ehowstuff.local password 'new-password'

Alternatively you can run:
/usr/bin/mysql_secure_installation

which will also give you the option of removing the test
databases and anonymous user created by default.  This is
strongly recommended for production servers.

See the manual for more instructions.

You can start the MySQL daemon with:
cd /usr ; /usr/bin/mysqld_safe &

You can test the MySQL daemon with mysql-test-run.pl
cd /usr/mysql-test ; perl mysql-test-run.pl

Please report any problems with the /usr/bin/mysqlbug script!

                                                           [  OK  ]
Starting mysqld:                                           [  OK  ]

3. Securing MySQL Database Server. This includes setting up the password for mysql root, remove anonymous users, disallow root login remotely and remove test database and access.

[root@centos64 ~]# /usr/bin/mysql_secure_installation




NOTE: RUNNING ALL PARTS OF THIS SCRIPT IS RECOMMENDED FOR ALL MySQL
      SERVERS IN PRODUCTION USE!  PLEASE READ EACH STEP CAREFULLY!


In order to log into MySQL to secure it, we'll need the current
password for the root user.  If you've just installed MySQL, and
you haven't set the root password yet, the password will be blank,
so you should just press enter here.

Enter current password for root (enter for none):
OK, successfully used password, moving on...

Setting the root password ensures that nobody can log into the MySQL
root user without the proper authorisation.

Set root password? [Y/n] y
New password:
Re-enter new password:
Password updated successfully!
Reloading privilege tables..
 ... Success!


By default, a MySQL installation has an anonymous user, allowing anyone
to log into MySQL without having to have a user account created for
them.  This is intended only for testing, and to make the installation
go a bit smoother.  You should remove them before moving into a
production environment.

Remove anonymous users? [Y/n] y
 ... Success!

Normally, root should only be allowed to connect from 'localhost'.  This
ensures that someone cannot guess at the root password from the network.

Disallow root login remotely? [Y/n] y
 ... Success!

By default, MySQL comes with a database named 'test' that anyone can
access.  This is also intended only for testing, and should be removed
before moving into a production environment.

Remove test database and access to it? [Y/n] y
 - Dropping test database...
 ... Success!
 - Removing privileges on test database...
 ... Success!

Reloading the privilege tables will ensure that all changes made so far
will take effect immediately.

Reload privilege tables now? [Y/n] y
 ... Success!

Cleaning up...



All done!  If you've completed all of the above steps, your MySQL
installation should now be secure.

Thanks for using MySQL!


4. For testing, login to MySQL Server using defined password :

[root@centos64 ~]# mysql -u root -p
Enter password:
Welcome to the MySQL monitor.  Commands end with ; or \g.
Your MySQL connection id is 10
Server version: 5.1.69 Source distribution

Copyright (c) 2000, 2013, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved.

Oracle is a registered trademark of Oracle Corporation and/or its
affiliates. Other names may be trademarks of their respective
owners.

Type 'help;' or '\h' for help. Type '\c' to clear the current input statement.

mysql> show databases;
+--------------------+
| Database           |
+--------------------+
| information_schema |
| mysql              |
+--------------------+
2 rows in set (0.01 sec)

mysql>

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