How to Choose a Good Domain Name

When deciding to create a presence on the web, one of the first steps you need to consider is picking a domain name for your website.  This name will represent you by tagging your website with a label that resonates within the minds of visitors.  The name can be up to 67 characters in length and consist of letters, numbers and hyphens.  One of the most important parts of a domain name is the extension or TLD (Top level domain).  Some of the common TLDs include .com, .net, .biz, .org. .edu. .gov., .mil and the list goes on.  While domain names are not exactly extinct, any observer will tell you that there is a shortage of good ones.

To the current day, well over 128 million domain names have been registered throughout the world.  Research shows that thousands of new registrations are being purchased on a daily basis.  The crave of domain names is what makes it so much harder for the newbie to acquire the name they truly want for their website.  If you came up with something simple and catchy such as or, forget about it – those domains were gone a long time ago.   The sad part of it all is that many domains are just sitting there inactive, waiting for someone to come through and make a bid.  It’s a crazy game but no need to fret.  Instead of getting frustrated about the domain name shortage, get creative.

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Keep it Short …

Even though you get up to 57 characters, using the maximum amount for your domain just isn’t practical.  In fact, anything over 10 characters is actually pushing it.  You don’t have to be a rocket scientist to know that shorter names are simply easier to remember.  They are also less vulnerable to typing errors.  There are however, exceptions to this rule.  Let’s say the name of your business is sort of long and you want to shorten it up with MWWF.  In this example, could be easier to remember than the abbreviated version.

Keep it Simple

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If you find that your domain name isn’t available, you may be tempted to get clever and come up with a neat variation.  Let’s say isn’t available.  In this case, you could decide to go with  Although symbols can help you get closer to the name you actually want, there are some drawbacks.  For one, symbols hardly ever resonate with internet users. If anything, they will omit the symbols and end up at the site of the website owner who beat you to the original domain. Secondly, your potential visitors could easily forget exactly where the symbols are to be placed in the URL, especially if you use more than one.   If at all possible, refrain from symbols.

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Be Unique

Sometimes, finding a good domain is simply all about thinking in ways others don’t.  This means coming up with different combinations of your ideal name, adding or subtracting words like “the” and focusing solely on your business.  The market you’re involved in may consist of thousands of businesses but only few, if any, will have the same name as your company.

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2 thoughts on “How to Choose a Good Domain Name

  1. Teen Philosopher says:

    I actually registered my domain name just for the sake of having an email, but then I got into making a simple website and got carried away by blogging on philosophy. Now the name of my site is different from my domain name… I suppose that is still alright?

  2. All the good domain names are taken already but When I read the article I felt that there are steps to obtain a Good Domain Name